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  BGR Show All 
Doctors start seeing new coronavirus symptom patterns in young patients
Coronavirus Symptoms
  • Coronavirus symptoms are no longer a mystery, but doctors dealing with the new surge in cases in some US states have noticed new patterns in patients.
  • Younger patients are seeking medical help as more of them are being infected than before.
  • Symptoms including abdominal pain and migraines are often reported, but rarely high fever.

The novel coronavirus pandemic is anything but contained in several US states which continue to report record numbers of cases every day. The US surpassed 60,000 daily cases just days after the 50,000 case milestone was reached. These figures are much higher than the previous peak of the outbreak and indicate the curve is far from being flattened.

As doctors continue to see an increased number of COVID-19 patients, they're starting to notice new symptoms patterns. It's not that the virus has become more deadly, but patients are reporting different symptoms.

Continue reading...

Today's Top Deals

  1. 3M N95 face masks are $5 right now at Amazon, and we can’t believe it
  2. 10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more
  3. Today’s best deals: 3M N95 face masks, Purell in stock, Echo speakers, $49 4K Roku Stick, MacBook Pro blowout, more

Trending Right Now:

  1. Researchers know what people the coronavirus is more likely to kill
  2. Astronomers spotted something strange in space and can’t explain it
  3. This is the good coronavirus vaccine news the world needs right now

Doctors start seeing new coronavirus symptom patterns in young patients originally appeared on BGR.com on Sat, 11 Jul 2020 at 12:05:05 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


The FDA warns that 55 hand sanitizer brands are toxic and potentially deadly
Hand Sanitizer
  • The FDA advises that 55 hand sanitizer brands contain methanol, also known as wood alcohol.
  • Methanol is toxic and can cause severe complications when absorbed, including permanent blindness.
  • When buying hand sanitizer, make sure that the product has at least 60% ethyl alcohol.

When the coronavirus pandemic started to sweep the country back in mid-March, there was a run on basic items like paper towels and toilet paper. For reasons that even defied explanation at the time, people started behaving as if a zombie apocalypse was upon us and that basic supplies would soon be in short supply. It was essentially a textbook definition of a misguided panic.

One item that was justifiably in short supply, however, was hand sanitizer. Especially with health agencies and prominent health officials like Dr. Anthony Fauci stressing the importance of washing one's hands multiple times a day, people started hoarding hand sanitizer bottles. In some areas, hand sanitizer was almost impossible to find for weeks on end.

Continue reading...

Today's Top Deals

  1. 3M N95 face masks are $5 right now at Amazon, and we can’t believe it
  2. 10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more
  3. Today’s best deals: 3M N95 face masks, Purell in stock, Echo speakers, $49 4K Roku Stick, MacBook Pro blowout, more

Trending Right Now:

  1. Researchers know what people the coronavirus is more likely to kill
  2. Astronomers spotted something strange in space and can’t explain it
  3. This is the good coronavirus vaccine news the world needs right now

The FDA warns that 55 hand sanitizer brands are toxic and potentially deadly originally appeared on BGR.com on Sat, 11 Jul 2020 at 10:33:21 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


SpaceX will try to launch another batch of Starlink satellites on Saturday
spacex launch stream
  • The SpaceX Starlink mission that was scheduled for Wednesday and then Friday has now been pushed to Saturday.
  • Weather conditions have repeatedly delayed the launch, which includes a batch of 57 new communications satellites.
  • The launch is slated for 10:55 a.m. ET on Saturday, weather permitting.

It's been something of a rough week for SpaceX. Nothing has really gone wrong, but the weather just really, really doesn't seem to want to cooperate with the company's plans to launch another batch of its Starlink communications satellites into orbit. Originally scheduled for Wednesday, the launch was pushed back to today, Friday the 10th, but that didn't work out either. Now, the back-up-to-the-back-up launch window is slated for Saturday, July 11th, at 10:55 a.m. ET.

This will be the third attempted launch of the Falcon 9 which is carrying not only a pair of new satellites for a company called BlackSky but also a heaping batch of 57 shiny new Starlink satellites. Well, actually they're not quite as shiny as they used to be, but we'll get to that in a minute.

Continue reading...

Today's Top Deals

  1. 3M N95 face masks are $5 right now at Amazon, and we can’t believe it
  2. 10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more
  3. Today’s best deals: 3M N95 face masks, Purell in stock, Echo speakers, $49 4K Roku Stick, MacBook Pro blowout, more

Trending Right Now:

  1. Researchers know what people the coronavirus is more likely to kill
  2. Astronomers spotted something strange in space and can’t explain it
  3. This is the good coronavirus vaccine news the world needs right now

SpaceX will try to launch another batch of Starlink satellites on Saturday originally appeared on BGR.com on Sat, 11 Jul 2020 at 09:01:05 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more
Amazon Deals

If you're on the lookout for the absolute best deals of the day, you've definitely come to the right place. Highlights include a coupon you can clip to get the best-selling coronavirus face masks on Amazon's whole site for $0.50 each, a rare opportunity to get genuine 3M N100 face masks that filter bacteria and viruses even better than N95 masks (>99.7% vs. >95%), 12-packs of Purell hand sanitizer for $2.48 per 1oz bottle, 3-packs of Purell for $8.30 including shipping, a new deeper discount for Apple's best-selling AirPods Pro, a $180 pulse oximeter ring that can warn you of a possible coronavirus infection for $116.99 with coupon code WX4H6VN5 (Mayo Clinic says blood oxygen saturation should not fall below 90%), $50 off Apple's most affordable iPad, a one-day sale that slashes up to 40% off popular Roborock robot vacuums, $30 off the Echo Show 5, and $40 off the Echo Show 8. Check out all of today's top deals down below.

Face Mask, Pack of 50: $24.99 ($0.50 / mask)

3M 8233PC1-B Lead Paint Removal Respirator - Quantity 10: $179.99 ($18.00 / mask)

Purell Advanced Hand Sanitizer Refreshing Gel, 1 Fl Oz (12-Pack): $29.70 for 12 bottles

Purell Advanced Hand Sanitizer Refreshing Gel, 1 Fl Oz (3-Pack): $8.30 for 3 bottles

Apple AirPods Pro: $232.50

Wellue Overnight Oxygen Saturation Tracker with Notification for Low O2 Level and Heart Rate, F…: $116.99 (use code WX4H6VN5 by 7/12)

Apple iPad (10.2-inch, Wi-Fi, 32GB) - Space Gray (Latest Model): $279.00

Save up to 40% off Roborock Robot Vacuums: $194.99 - $359.99

Echo Show 5 -- Smart display with Alexa – stay connected with video calling - Charcoal: $59.99

Echo Show 8 -- HD smart display with Alexa – stay connected with video calling - Charcoal: $89.99

Today's Top Deals

  1. 3M N95 face masks are $5 right now at Amazon, and we can’t believe it
  2. 10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more
  3. Today’s best deals: 3M N95 face masks, Purell in stock, Echo speakers, $49 4K Roku Stick, MacBook Pro blowout, more

Trending Right Now:

  1. Researchers know what people the coronavirus is more likely to kill
  2. Astronomers spotted something strange in space and can’t explain it
  3. This is the good coronavirus vaccine news the world needs right now

10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more originally appeared on BGR.com on Sat, 11 Jul 2020 at 07:48:12 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


Apple warns that you could break your MacBook display with a camera cover
Apple: MacBook Camera Cover
  • Apple published a new support document in July to warn MacBook owners not to close their laptops when a camera cover is on, as it could damage the display.
  • Apple reminds MacBook owners that the FaceTime HD camera has an indicator light that always alerts the user when the camera is on.
  • If you're going to use a camera cover, never forget to remove it before you close your MacBook.

As we've all become increasingly concerned with data privacy, covers for laptop webcams have become a necessary purchase for many laptop owners. The problem is that most laptops weren't designed with accessories being attached to the display in mind, no matter how small, which is why Apple deemed it necessary to issue a warning on its website last week. As spotted by MacRumors on Friday, Apple now has a support page dedicated to telling MacBook owners to avoid closing their laptops when a cover is on the camera so as not to risk damaging the screen.

Continue reading...

Today's Top Deals

  1. 3M N95 face masks are $5 right now at Amazon, and we can’t believe it
  2. 10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more
  3. Today’s best deals: 3M N95 face masks, Purell in stock, Echo speakers, $49 4K Roku Stick, MacBook Pro blowout, more

Trending Right Now:

  1. Researchers know what people the coronavirus is more likely to kill
  2. Astronomers spotted something strange in space and can’t explain it
  3. This is the good coronavirus vaccine news the world needs right now

Apple warns that you could break your MacBook display with a camera cover originally appeared on BGR.com on Fri, 10 Jul 2020 at 21:45:28 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


NASA’s Curiosity rover is on a road trip
mars curiosity
  • NASA is sending its Curiosity rover on a journey to a new area of Mount Sharp, the massive peak that sits in the center of the Gale Crater.
  • The journey is short by Earth standards at just over a mile, but it'll be a big accomplishment for the aging robot.
  • When the rover arrives at its next destination it will investigate the presence of salts that may indicate ancient lakes once dominated the region.

Summer here on Earth means spending time outdoors, maybe a dip in the pool every now and then, and of course the ritual of traveling great distances in our vehicles. NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has spent over a year hanging out around an area of the colossal Mount Sharp known as the clay-bearing unit, and it's ready to make a move of its own.

In a new blog post declaring a "summer road trip" for Curiosity, NASA explains that the rover will spend a considerable amount of time forging a new path to a location that will allow it to scale a new area of the colossal Martian mountain. The trip will only put around a mile on Curiosity's odometer, but that's no small feat for a robot exploring another planet.

Continue reading...

Today's Top Deals

  1. 3M N95 face masks are $5 right now at Amazon, and we can’t believe it
  2. 10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more
  3. Today’s best deals: 3M N95 face masks, Purell in stock, Echo speakers, $49 4K Roku Stick, MacBook Pro blowout, more

Trending Right Now:

  1. Researchers know what people the coronavirus is more likely to kill
  2. Astronomers spotted something strange in space and can’t explain it
  3. This is the good coronavirus vaccine news the world needs right now

NASA’s Curiosity rover is on a road trip originally appeared on BGR.com on Fri, 10 Jul 2020 at 20:30:23 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


The cable industry keeps finding new ways to bleed its customers dry
Cable vs streaming
  • The ongoing saga of the cable vs streaming tug-of-war (which has had mostly the streaming side winning for more than a year now, as the cable industry keeps bleeding subscribers) continues to garner new headlines that are, sadly, pretty predictable at this point.
  • Spectrum, for example, is among the many cable brands that have greeted an inexorable decline in customers by continuing to raise prices.
  • It's the kind of behavior that will no doubt continue to inspire consumers to cut the cord and go all-in on streaming and digital TV services.

Earlier this year, like so many of you now, I finally cut the cord and ditched my Dish subscription -- something I was finally compelled to do after reaching my breaking point over a mix of subpar service, an inscrutable monthly bill, and a price-to-value ratio that was just too out of whack. Contrast that with the near-universal user appreciation of Netflix, which a new survey from the Cowen & Co analytics firm has found is so strong that 55% of subscribers would be fine with paying a little more each month to keep the service. The larger point being -- the coronavirus pandemic has changed many of our viewing habits, but not the habits of ... everyone, shall we say.

Case in point: The cable industry is up to its usual shenanigans, never mind that it continues to lose customers at a rapid clip. You can probably guess what we're referring to -- more despicable fee increases, representing the industry's ongoing attempt to manage its decline by bleeding customers dry.

Continue reading...

Today's Top Deals

  1. 3M N95 face masks are $5 right now at Amazon, and we can’t believe it
  2. 10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more
  3. Today’s best deals: 3M N95 face masks, Purell in stock, Echo speakers, $49 4K Roku Stick, MacBook Pro blowout, more

Trending Right Now:

  1. Researchers know what people the coronavirus is more likely to kill
  2. Astronomers spotted something strange in space and can’t explain it
  3. This is the good coronavirus vaccine news the world needs right now

The cable industry keeps finding new ways to bleed its customers dry originally appeared on BGR.com on Fri, 10 Jul 2020 at 19:15:35 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


Why the low coronavirus death rate isn’t the good news you think it is
Coronavirus update
  • Friday's coronavirus update represented a continuation of the frightening patterns we've seen in recent days, including massive surges of new cases in states like Florida (which added more than 11,000 new cases to its overall total at week's end).
  • White House health advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci has a stern message of warning for people who aren't taking the coronavirus seriously.
  • Some people are relying on the fact that the overall death rate from the virus in the US remains low, as a justification for not worrying too much about the virus.

Even if you've become a bit numb to the daily cadence of coronavirus pandemic headlines, this crisis has a way of sneaking up on you and doing its level best to shock you with something new. Case in point, just take a look at Friday's new numbers out of Florida, one of a handful of states that have become the most frightening virus hotspots in the US.

Remember all those scary coronavirus headlines out of Italy earlier this year? As of right now, the country has reported 242,639 cases of the virus, according to the latest numbers from Johns Hopkins University. Well, Friday's new numbers mean the state of Florida has beaten that total all by itself, never mind the rest of the US. The Sunshine State reported an additional 11,433 cases of the virus Friday, pushing the state's cumulative total past 244,000. This is Exhibit A for why White House health advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci has been pushing a new messaging theme in his public remarks this week -- that the country, by and large, is not taking this virus seriously enough. And that we need to heed a specific warning.

Continue reading...

Today's Top Deals

  1. 3M N95 face masks are $5 right now at Amazon, and we can’t believe it
  2. 10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: 3M N100 face masks, Purell, new lower AirPods Pro price, $50 off iPad, more
  3. Today’s best deals: 3M N95 face masks, Purell in stock, Echo speakers, $49 4K Roku Stick, MacBook Pro blowout, more

Trending Right Now:

  1. Researchers know what people the coronavirus is more likely to kill
  2. Astronomers spotted something strange in space and can’t explain it
  3. This is the good coronavirus vaccine news the world needs right now

Why the low coronavirus death rate isn’t the good news you think it is originally appeared on BGR.com on Fri, 10 Jul 2020 at 18:04:27 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


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  TechNewsWorld Show All 
AI Advantages in the Wake of the Pandemic
Artificial intelligence will play a major role as we try to move to a post-pandemic world, especially as it pertains to tracking people's health and wellbeing in public areas. Employers will tap technology solutions to help them face challenges such as adhering to new rules and regulations, monitoring compliance, and ensuring employee confidence and morale remains positive.

Tech's Role in the Future of Health and Public Safety
Digital technologies can help shift health and public safety agencies from a "detect and respond" approach to a "predict and prevent" stratagem. They can also set the stage for a more connected and data-led approach through robust cybersecurity architectures, efficient remote workforces, and secure connectivity services.

John McAfee Emerges With Private Cell Phone Data Service
The Ghost Cell Phone Data Service is part of a larger ecosystem which includes McAfee's Ghost cryptocurrency and GhostX Exchange for private cryptocurrency exchange. "The Ghost brand will encompass a range of practical, real world tools for people to protect our rights and take back our privacy," McAfee said. "Privacy is a human right."

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Digital Fraud Flourishing During Pandemic: Report
If you conducted e-commerce transactions since the pandemic struck, you have probably been the target, or even a victim, of online fraud. A report from Sift titled "Q2 2020 Digital Trust & Safety Index" details a 109 percent increase in content abuse and growth of the fraud economy from January through May 2020.

More Autonomous Cloud From Oracle
Oracle's new offerings, really packaging of existing recent high-performance products for the enterprise market, enable companies to continue running their data and datacenters on premise while still benefitting from gains made by its autonomous database like eliminating most forms of routine maintenance and operations activities.

Building Supply Chain Resilience During a Global Disruption
As a result of the severe business disruptions brought about in recent months by the pandemic, many businesses have been reconsidering how to retool their supply chain to build in more resiliency. From digitizing the supply chain to developing more local and regional components, businesses are finding new and innovative ways to strengthen their capacity to keep moving forward during crisis.

Uber Eats Postmates for $2.6B, Bolsters Ground Game
Uber is looking to food delivery for rescue from falling revenues caused by people staying at home because of the pandemic. Gross bookings for Uber Rides have decreased by three percent year over year, the company noted in its Q1 2020 financial report. On July 6, Uber announced that it's acquiring on-demand food delivery service PostMates for $2.65 billion. The deal is expected to close in Q1 2021.

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PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World CompetitionThe winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.



7 tax scams to watch out for this year

7 tax scams to watch out for this yearIn case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.



What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus programPARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.



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LinkedIn faces lawsuit over claims it 'secretly' read iPhone clipboard data
The clipboard detection in iOS 14 isn’t just prompting developers to rethink app privacy — it’s also putting these companies in legal trouble. Reuters reports that iPhone user Adam Bauer has sued LinkedIn over claims the job-focused social network “s...

Hitting the Books: What astronauts can learn from nuclear submariners
We’ve dreamt of colonizing the stars since our first tenuous steps across the moon, yet fifty years after the Apollo 11 mission, the prospect of living and working beyond the bounds of Earth remains tantalizingly out of reach. In his latest book, Spa...

Recommended Reading: The Magic Leap project the world may never see
Fading light: The story of Magic Leap’s lost mixed reality magnum opusAdi Robertson, The VergeLike a lot of companies this year, Magic Leap faced massive layoffs. The company was able to avoid those after it raised $350 million, but it did shift to e...

The Morning After: Amazon's TikTok ban was just some kind of mistake
Amazon has been in the streaming video game for a long time, but you wouldn’t know it by trying to navigate the company’s awkward streaming interface. The good news is that its Prime Video subscription package has better content on the way, but the b...

'Leaked' video teases a drift-modified Mustang Mach-E
Ford’s all-electric Mustang Mach-E hasn’t rolled out yet, but someone is working on a special one-off, judging by a video posted to YouTube a few days ago. As noted by Autoblog and Jalopnik, this stripped down machine is obviously a Mach-E, but with...

Tesla's 'Battery Day' event is scheduled for September 22nd
Tesla’s long-delayed battery event has a new date, according to a new SEC filing spotted by Electrek. The automaker’s “Battery Day” presentation is now scheduled to happen on September 22nd after its annual stockholders meeting that will take place a...

Facial recognition linked to a second wrongful arrest by Detroit police
A false facial recognition match has led to the arrest of another innocent person. According to the Detroit Free Press, police in the city arrested a man for allegedly reaching into a person’s car, taking their phone and throwing it, breaking the cas...

Amazon's 'New World' MMO is delayed again
Amazon is once delaying its upcoming colonial online RPG New World (via PCGamer). The company's Amazon Games studio says it now plans to release the game sometime in the spring of 2021. It's also delaying the title's final beta test to that same time...

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  CNET News Show All 
Snag a Fire TV Stick 4K for an all-time low $25 - CNET
You need to be an Amazon Prime customer to use the discount code, which lets you watch Mrs. Maisel in glorious 4K.
SpaceX launch of 57 Starlink satellites that wear sun visors delayed again - CNET
The first launch of a big batch of satellites equipped with shades to reduce their brightness was set to blast off soon.
Amazon says it sent warning about TikTok app to employees by mistake - CNET
The online retail giant had cited the app's "security risks," without offering specifics.
Jeep teases Gladiator or Wrangler with 392 Hemi V8 - Roadshow
Jeep's first factory V8-powered Wrangler (or Gladiator) could pack over 470 horsepower.
3D Build & Play is 3D printing for preschoolers that's 20% off - CNET
3Doodler has a 3D playset with backgrounds, themed stories and molds to make the characters -- right now, just $24.
It's a charger sale: Save up to 40% on a trio of ways to power your phone, laptop and more - CNET
Aukey's car charger, wireless charging pad and 30,000-mAh power bank are packed with intriguing features.
Trump eyes a TikTok ban: Everything you need to know - CNET
Even Amazon is concerned about possible "security risks" with the app.
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AI Site Claims Simulated Conversations With Famous Dead Scientists
Slashdot reader shirappu writes: AI|Writer is an experiment in which artificial intelligence is used to simulate both real and fictitious famous personalities through written correspondence. Users can ask questions and receive e

Terry Pratchett's Earliest Stories To Be Published In September
Long-time Slashdot reader sjritt00 writes: A final collection of Terry Pratchett's early stories will be published in September as The Time-Travelling Caveman. These stories appeared in the Bucks Free Press and Western Daily Pres

Is Twitter Shifting the Balance of Power From Companies to Their Employees?
Last week leaked audio surfaced of investors arguing that journalists have too much power. But the Verge's Silicon Valley editor asks, "What if you take the whole discussion of "tech versus journalism" and reframe it as 'man

DuckDuckGo Restored in India, Responds to Favicon Concerns
DuckDuckGo made the news twice this week. First its service was reinstated across India last Saturday, after being unreachable for nearly three days, for reasons which remain unclear. "We have contacted the Indian government but

Apple To Teach Teachers To Teach Coding For Free
theodp writes: From the Home Office in Cupertino: "Apple today announced a new set of tools to help educators teach coding to students from grade school to college. In addition to significant enhancements to the Develop in Swift a

US Secret Service Creates New Cyber Fraud Task Force
The U.S. Secret Service announced the creation of the Cyber Fraud Task Force (CFTF) after the merger of its Financial Crimes Task Forces (FCTFs) and Electronic Crimes Task Forces (ECTFs) into a single unified network. Bleeping Com

'Broken Heart Syndrome' Has Increased During COVID-19 Pandemic, Small Study Suggests
Rick Schumann writes: Researchers at a Cleveland clinic performed a study with 1,914 patients into a phenomenon called "Broken Heart Syndrome," where someone can be experiencing heart attack-like symptoms, but it's not a heart att

Police Surveilled Protests With Help From Twitter-Affiliated Startup Dataminr
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Intercept: Leveraging close ties to Twitter, controversial artificial intelligence startup Dataminr helped law enforcement digitally monitor the protests that swept the country followin


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Talking Tech

      

What are Karen and Kevin doing now? America's latest video series online -- all the time

The comfort and abundance of smartphone cameras has made it easier to document people doing stupid things, and the Internet is just waiting for you, too.

      

Amazon says memo to employees banning TikTok was sent in error

A company spokesperson told Reuters there has been no change in its policy on TikTok.

      

'He's going to kill us:' Woman says Lyft driver shot her niece in the leg

"This individual was shooting at women, and terrorizing them," a family attorney said.

      

Race and class divide: Black and Hispanic service workers are tech's growing underclass

Bus drivers, janitors and security guards, a high percentage of whom are underrepresented minorities, get none of the perks at big tech companies.

      

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Original Content podcast: Yep, ‘Hamilton’ is still very good

With the release of “Hamilton” on Disney+, Jordan and Darrell finally got to watch the musical biography of Founding Father Alexander Hamilton — albeit in recorded form, rather than live on-stage.

And as we discuss on the latest episode of the Original Content podcast, they were pretty delighted by what they found. Not that a Broadway hit that’s won virtually every award really needs defenders at this point — but the Disney+ version is beautifully filmed, and it’s nice to see that five years later, “Hamilton” still works for new viewers.

Anthony, meanwhile, saw the show back in 2015 and has listened to the soundtrack many, many times. But after years of reading about “Hamilton” rather than experiencing it directly, Disney+ gave him a chance to rediscover how virtuosic and entertaining the show is from beginning to end, with one memorable song after another.

We did have a few reservations, about composer Lin-Manuel Miranda’s decision to cast himself as Hamilton, and about the show’s politics — we certainly appreciated its attempt to reclaim the founding story of the United States as a story for immigrants and people of color, but as others have pointed out, downplaying slavery and uncritically celebrating the creation of America’s financial institutions feels a bit strange, at least in 2020.

You can listen to our review in the player below, subscribe using Apple Podcasts or find us in your podcast player of choice. If you like the show, please let us know by leaving a review on Apple. You can also follow us on Twitter or send us feedback directly. (Or suggest shows and movies for us to review!)

If you’d like to skip ahead, here’s how the episode breaks down:
0:00 Introduction
0:21 “Hamilton” review
30:52 “Hamilton” spoiler discussion


This Week in Apps: US ponders TikTok ban, apps see a record Q2, iOS 14 public beta arrives

Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the Extra Crunch series that recaps the latest OS news, the applications they support and the money that flows through it all.

The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 204 billion downloads and $120 billion in consumer spending in 2019. People are now spending three hours and 40 minutes per day using apps, rivaling TV. Apps aren’t just a way to pass idle hours — they’re a big business. In 2019, mobile-first companies had a combined $544 billion valuation, 6.5x higher than those without a mobile focus.

In this Extra Crunch series, we help you keep up with the latest news from the world of apps, delivered on a weekly basis.

This week, we’re digging into the news of a possible TikTok ban in the U.S. and how that’s already impacting rival apps. Also, both Android and iOS saw beta launches this week — a near-ready Android 11 beta 2 and the  public beta of iOS 14. We also look at the coronavirus’ impact on the app economy in Q2, which saw record downloads, usage and consumer spending. In other app news, Instagram launched Reels in India, Tinder debuted video chat and Quibi flounders while Pokémon GO continues to reel it in.

Headlines

Apple release iOS 14 public beta

Image Credits: Apple

The much-anticipated new version of the iOS mobile operating system, iOS 14, became available for public testing on Thursday. Users who join the public beta will be able to try out the latest features, like the App Library, Widgets and smart stacks, an updated Messages app, a brand-new Translate app, biking directions in Apple Maps, upgraded Siri and various improvements to core apps like Notes, Reminders, Weather, Home, Safari and others.

When iOS 14 launches to the general public, it may also include support for QR code payments in Apple Pay, according to a report of new assets discovered in the code base.

Alongside the public beta, developers received their second round of betas for iOS 14, iPadOS 14 and other Apple software.

Google’s efforts in speeding up Android updates has been good news for Android 10


The Exchange: Remote dealmaking, rapid-fire IPOs, and how much $250M buys you

Welcome to The Exchange, an upcoming weekly newsletter featuring TechCrunch and Extra Crunch reporting on startups, money, and markets. You can sign up for it here to receive it regularly when it launches on July 25th. You can email me about it here, or talk to me about it on Twitter. Let’s go!

Ahead of parsing Q2 venture capital data, we got a look this week into the VC world’s take on making deals over Zoom. A few months ago it was an open question whether VCs would simply stop making new investments if they couldn’t chop it up in person with founders. That, it turns out, was mostly wrong.

This week we learned that most VCs are open to making remote deals happen, even if 40% of VCs have actually done so. This raises a worrying question: If only 40% of VCs have actually made a fully remote deal, how many deals happened in Q2?

Judging from my inbox over the past few months, it’s been an active period. But we can’t lean on anecdata for this topic; The Exchange will parse Q2 VC data next week, hopefully, provided that we can scrape together the data points we need to feel confident in our take. More soon.

Private markets

As TechCrunch reported Friday, some startups are delaying raising capital for a few quarters. They can do this by limiting expenses. The question for startups that are doing this is what shape they’ll be in when they do surface to hunt for fresh funds; can they still grow at an attractive pace while trying to extend their runway through burn conservation?

But there’s another option besides waiting to raise a new round, and not raising at all. Startups can raise an extension to their preceding deal! Perhaps I am noticing something that isn’t a trend, or not a trend yet, but there have been a number of startups recently raised extensions lately that caught my eye. For example, this week MariaDB raised a $25 million Series C extension, for example. Also this week Sayari put together $2.5 million in a Series B extension. And CALA put together $3 million in a Seed extension. Finally, across the pond Machine Labs put together one million pounds in another Seed extension this week.

I don’t know yet how to numerically drill into the available venture data to tell if we’re really seeing an extension wave, but do let me know if you have any notes to share. And, to be completely clear, the above rounds could easily be merely random and un-thematic, so please don’t read into them more deeply than that they were announced in the last few days and match something that we’re watching.

Public markets

On the public markets front, the news is all good. Tech stocks are up in general, and software stocks set some new record highs this week. It’s nearly impossible to recall how scary the world was back in March and April in today’s halcyon stock market run, but it was only a few months back that stocks were falling sharply.

The return-to-form has helped a number of companies go public this year like Vroom, Accolade, Agora, and others. This week was another busy period for startups, former startups, and other companies looking to go out.

In quick fashion to save time, this week we got to see GoHealth’s first IPO range, nCino’s second (more on the two companies’ finances here), learned that Palantir is going public (it’s financial history as best we can tell is here), and even got an IPO filing (S-1) from Rackspace, as it looks towards the public markets yet again.


The Exchange explores startups, markets and money. You can read it every morning on Extra Crunch, and now you can receive it in your inbox. Sign up for The Exchange newsletter, which drops every Friday starting July 25.


The IPO waters are so warm that Lemonade is still up more than 100% from its IPO price. So long as growth companies that are miles from making money can command rich valuations, expect companies to keep running through the public market’s door.

There’s fun stuff on the horizon. Coinbase might file later this year, or in early 2021. And the Airbnb IPO is probably coming within four or five quarters. Gear up to read some SEC filings.

Funding rounds worth noting

The coolest funding round of the week was obviously the one that I wrote about, namely the $2.2 million that MonkeyLearn put together from a pair of lead investors. But other companies raised money, and among them the following investments stood out:

  • Sony poured a quarter of a billion dollars into the maker of Fortnite, for a 1.4% stake. This rounds stands out for how small a piece of Epic Games that Sony got its hands on. It feels reminiscent of the recent investment deluge into Jio.
  • TruePill raised $25 million in a Series B. In the modern world it seems batty to me that I have to get off my ass, go to Walgreens or CVS, wait in line, and then ask someone to please sell me Claritin D. What an enormous waste of time. TruePill, which does pharma delivery, can’t get here fast enough. Also, investors in TruePill are probably fully aware that Amazon spent $1 billion on PillPack just a few year ago.
  • From the slightly off-the-wall category, this headline from TechCrunch: UK’s Farewill raises $25M for its new-approach online will writing, funerals and other death services.” Farewill is a startup name that is so bad it probably works; I won’t forget it any time soon, even though I don’t live in the U.K.! And this deal goes to show how big the internet really is. There’s so much demand for digital services that a company with Farewill’s particular focus can put together enough revenue growth to command a $25 million Series B.
  • Finally, TechCrunch’s Ron Miller covered a $50 million investment into OwnBackup. What matters about this deal was how Ron spoke about it: “OwnBackup has made a name for itself primarily as a backup and disaster-recovery system for the Salesforce ecosystem, and today the company announced a $50 million investment.” What to take from that? That Salesforce’s ecosystem is maybe bigger than we thought.

That’s The Exchange for the week. Keep your eye on SaaS valuations, the latest S-1 filings, and the latest fundings. Chat Monday.


CBP says it’s ‘unrealistic’ for Americans to avoid its license plate surveillance

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has admitted that there is no practical way for Americans to avoid having their movements tracked by its license plate readers, according to its latest privacy assessment.

CBP published its new assessment — three years after its first — to notify the public that it plans to tap into a commercial database, which aggregates license plate data from both private and public sources, as part of its border enforcement efforts.

The U.S. has a massive network of license plate readers, typically found on the roadside, to collect and record the license plates of vehicles passing by. License plate readers can capture thousands of license plates each minute. License plates are recorded and stored in massive databases, giving police and law enforcement agencies the ability to track millions of vehicles across the country.

The agency updated its privacy assessment in part because Americans “may not be aware” that the agency can collect their license plate data.

“CBP cannot provide timely notice of license plate reads obtained from various sources outside of its control,” the privacy assessment said. “Many areas of both public and private property have signage that alerts individuals that the area is under surveillance; however, this signage does not consistently include a description of how and with whom such data may be shared.”

But buried in the document, the agency admitted: “The only way to opt out of such surveillance is to avoid the impacted area, which may pose significant hardships and be generally unrealistic.”

CBP struck a similar tone in 2017 during a trial that scanned the faces of American travelers as they departed the U.S., a move that drew ire from civil liberties advocates at the time. CBP told Americans that travelers who wanted to opt-out of the face scanning had to “refrain from traveling.”

The document added that the privacy risk to Americans is “enhanced” because the agency “may access [license plate data] captured anywhere in the United States,” including outside of the 100-mile border zone within which the CBP typically operates.

CBP said that it will reduce the risk by only accessing license plate data when there is “circumstantial or supporting evidence” to further an investigation, and will only let CBP agents access data within a five-year period from the date of the search.

When asked about its privacy assessment, CBP spokesperson Matthew Dyman responded: “How would you be able to opt out of a license plate reader? Can I opt out of speed cameras here in DC?”

CBP doesn’t have the best track record with license plate data. Last year, CBP confirmed that a subcontractor, Perceptics, improperly copied license plate data on “fewer than 100,000” people over a period of a month-and-a-half at a U.S. port of entry on the southern border. The agency later suspended its contract with Perceptics.

Updated with CBP response. 


Daily Crunch: Rackspace is going public again

We look at Rackspace’s finances, a Facebook code change causes numerous app issues and electric vehicle company Rivian raises $2.5 billion. Here’s your Daily Crunch for July 10, 2020.

The big story: Rackspace is going public again

The cloud computing company first went public in 2008, before accepting a $4.3 billion offer to go private from Apollo Global Management. Rackspace says it will use the proceeds from the IPO to lower its debt load.

Alex Wilhelm took a deep dive into Rackspace’s finances, concluding that the proper valuation is a “puzzle”:

The company is tech-ish, which means it will find some interest. But its slow growth rate, heavy debts and lackluster margins make it hard to pin a fair multiple onto.

The tech giants

New report outlines potential roadmap for Apple’s ARM-based MacBooks — Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo said that a 13.3-inch MacBook powered by Apple’s new processors will arrive in the fourth quarter of this year.

Facebook code change caused outage for Spotify, Pinterest and Waze apps — Looks like Facebook was responsible for some crashing apps this morning.

California reportedly launches antitrust investigation into Google — This makes California the 49th state to launch an antitrust investigation into the search giant, according to Politico.

Startups, funding and venture capital

Rivian raises $2.5 billion as it pushes to bring its electric RT1 pickup, R1S SUV to market — The company plans to bring its electric pickup truck and SUV, as well as delivery vans for Amazon, to market in 2021.

A glint of hope for India’s food delivery market as Zomato projects monthly cash burn of less than $1 million — “We’ll only lose $1 million this month” doesn’t feel like a huge accomplishment, but at least things seem to be headed in the right direction.

Advice and analysis from Extra Crunch

How Thor Fridriksson’s ‘Trivia Royale’ earned 2.5 million downloads in 3 weeks — The latest game from the QuizUp founder was (briefly) the top app in the App Store. We talk to Fridriksson about how he did it.

COVID-19 pivot: Travel unicorn Klook sees jump in staycations — With bookings for overseas experiences plummeting, Klook began offering do-it-yourself kits for stay-at-home projects and partnered with landmark sites to offer virtual tours.

Operator Collective brings diversity and inclusion to enterprise investing — The firm, founded last year, said it currently has 130 operator LPs, 90% of them women and 40% of them people of color.

(Reminder: Extra Crunch is our subscription membership program, which aims to democratize information about startups. You can sign up here.)

Everything else

NASA signs agreement with Japan to cooperate across Space Station, Artemis and Lunar Gateway projects — Japan first expressed its intent to participate in the Lunar Gateway program in October 2019, making it one of the first countries to do so.

Equity: Silicon Valley is built on immigrant innovation — The latest episode of Equity discusses how recent visa changes will affect Silicon Valley.

Five reasons to attend TC Early Stage online — July 21 and 22! I will be there!

The Daily Crunch is TechCrunch’s roundup of our biggest and most important stories. If you’d like to get this delivered to your inbox every day at around 3pm Pacific, you can subscribe here.


Google’s Fitbit deal could avoid EU antitrust probe by agreeing not to use health data for ads

Google announced its plans to acquire Fitbit for $2.1 billion back in November. As of this writing, the deal has yet to go through, courtesy of all the usual regulatory scrutiny that occurs any time one large company buys another. EU regulators are often a key hurdle for these sorts of deals, and this time it may be no different.

Citing “people familiar with the matter,” Reuters notes that Google may be facing down some scrutiny in the form of an EU antitrust investigation if it doesn’t make some concessions. The heart of the concern here is a matter of health privacy. Fitbit — like many other wearable companies — collects a tremendous amount of health information from wearers.

Google, of course, is a company tremendously invested in data and advertising. Critics of the deal have suggested that purchasing Fitbit would provide yet another rich vein of data for Google to mine. As such, the deal could hinge on the promise that Google will never use health data to sell ads.

The stipulation is in keeping with a promise the company made when the acquisition was first announced, with the company’s head of hardware Rick Osterloh promising, “[P]rivacy and security are paramount. When you use our products, you’re trusting Google with your information. We understand this is a big responsibility and we work hard to protect your information, put you in control and give you transparency about your data.”

In a follow-up to this week’s reporting, the company noted that it believes the acquisition would increase competition. While Fitbit has a sizable footprint, Apple, Xiaomi and Huawei currently dominate the category, due in part to Fitbit’s late start in the smartwatch category. Google’s efforts to make inroads through Wear OS have largely come up short, though the company did also purchase a chunk of smartwatch tech from Fossil last January.

A spokesperson also attempted to put to rest potential regulatory fears, stating, “Throughout this process we have been clear about our commitment not to use Fitbit health and wellness data for Google ads and our responsibility to provide people with choice and control with their data.”

Regulators are set to decide on the deal by July 20. Google reportedly has until July 13 to present its concessions.


How Thor Fridriksson’s ‘Trivia Royale’ earned 2.5M downloads in 3 weeks

In its first few weeks of release, the latest game from QuizUp founder Thor Fridriksson took the top spot in the Games Section of Apple’s App Store and was the top app (for a brief time) in the App Store at large.

Since its launch on June 17, Trivia Royale has been downloaded more than 2.5 million times, with day-one retention of 45% and week-one retention of 45% on iOS, according to the company. Average daily usage per user is around 30 minutes. It currently sits in the number six spot in the Free Games category on the App Store.

There is no shortage of mobile games, but in such a cluttered space, it’s difficult to break through the noise. So how did Trivia Royale do it?

The game, which lets users compete in a 1,000-person, single-elimination trivia tournament, is built on the Teatime Games platform. Teatime emphasizes the fun of playing against other humans in the mobile gaming landscape, giving users the ability to communicate via video chat while they play in a game on their smartphone.

The platform allows game developers to use this video chat functionality, which comes with Snapchat-like face filters or Apple Memoji-style avatars, on their own games. But for Teatime to truly succeed as a gaming platform, the company needed a hit game, Fridriksson said.

The serial entrepreneur told TechCrunch that he decided to take off his CEO hat and return to his product roots by focusing on a category that few people know as well as he does: trivia.

The Trivia Royale tournament combines the scale of Battle Royale with the durability of trivia — whether it’s Jeopardy, HQ Trivia, bar trivia or this, we can’t get enough of it — or lets users match against one other player in a single category of trivia.

I’ve played around on the game for a while now and can say that it’s very well done, from the design to the production value. But more important than the mechanics of the tournament or the typeface or even the content of the questions are the avatars, which let users express themselves through customization and their real-life facial expressions.

But none of that means anything if players don’t join the game. So how did Trivia Royale earn more than 2.5 million downloads (and climbing) in a matter of days?

A big bet on TikTok

Fridriksson told TechCrunch that he has to give a ton of credit to his kids (who are 15 and 11). His daughter told him about TikTok and gave him a list of her favorite stars, including Addison Rae and Dixie D’Amelio.


LA-based Replicated adds former GitLab head of product as its chief product officer

Replicated, the Los Angeles-based company pitching monitoring and management services for Kubernetes-based applications, has managed to bring on the former head of product of the $2.75 billion-valued programming giant GitLab as its new chief product officer. 

Mark Pundsack is joining the company as it moves to scale its business. At GitLab, Pundsack saw the company grow from 70 employees to 1,300 as it scaled its business through its on-premise offerings.

Replicated is hoping to bring the same kind of on-premise services to a broad array of enterprise clients, according to company chief executive Grant Miller.

First introduced to Replicated while working with CircleCI, it was the company’s newfound traction since the launch of its Kubernetes deployment management toolkit that caused him to take a second look.

“The momentum that Replicated has created with their latest offering is tremendous; really changing the trajectory of the company,” said Pundsack in a statement. “When I was able to get close to the product, team, and customers, I knew this was something that I wanted to be a part of. This company is in such a unique position to create value throughout the entire enterprise software ecosystem; this sort of reach is incredibly rare. The potential reminds me a lot of the early days of GitLab.”

It’s a huge coup for Replicated, according to Miller.

“Mark created the core product strategy at GitLab; transforming GitLab from a source control company to a complete DevOps platform, with incredible support for Kubernetes,” said Miller. “There really isn’t a better background for a product leader at Replicated; Mark has witnessed GitLab’s evolution from a traditional on-prem installation towards a Kubernetes-based installation and management experience. This is the same transition that many of our customers are going through and Mark has already done it with one of the best. I have so much confidence that his involvement with our product will lead to more success for our customers.”

Pundsack is the second new executive hire from Replicated in six months, as the company looks to bring more muscle to its C-suite and expand its operations.


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A beginner’s guide to robot programming with Python

Let’s face it, robots are cool. They’re also going to run the world some day, and hopefully, at that time they will take pity on their poor soft fleshy creators (a.k.a. robotics developers) and help us build a space utopia filled with plenty. I’m joking of course, but only sort of. In my ambition to have some small influence over the matter, I took a course in autonomous robot control theory last year, which culminated in my building a Python-based robotic simulator that allowed me to practice control theory on a simple, mobile, programmable robot. In this article, I’m going to show how to…

This story continues at The Next Web

Australia to start paying EV owners for transferring electricity back to the national grid

Electric vehicles can help keep the air clean in our cities – as we’ve seen recently with the reduction of traffic through COVID-19 lockdowns – but they face two obstacles. In the short term they’re still expensive. In the long term charging millions of vehicles from the electricity grid presents challenges. I’m part of a new project, launched today, that tackles both of these obstacles head-on, and it could mean owners earn more money than they’re likely to pay for charging their electric vehicles. Paid for battery power The Realizing Electric Vehicle-to-grid Services project (REVS) will see owners paid to…

This story continues at The Next Web

Build beautiful and fast sites with this intuitive website builder

TLDR: Easy website creation for visual builders is the calling card of this Sparkle Pro Website Builder lifetime subscription offer. Website builder apps have a tough job. They need a robust set of cutting edge features and customization options to keep web development pros happy, while being simple enough that a first-time user can get a good looking site completed without pulling their hair out.  That’s a finer line than you might realize. Many apps and services are either too simplistic and short of creative options for the diehards, or head-swimmingly complicated for the newbies. However, Mac owners have been…

This story continues at The Next Web

Javascript regular expressions aren’t that daunting — here’s how to design your own

The first time I ever encountered a regular expression was many years ago now, but I still remember my first thoughts on it: What is this string-like thing? I don’t want to touch it, it looks scary. I don’t remember quite what that regex was doing, or how exactly it looked like, but it scared me to death. In hindsight, I now realize that it wasn’t actually that scary after all. In face, it was an easy way to solve the problem in hand. But why did I ever feel this way? It’s just the awkwardness of the syntax, they certainly…

This story continues at The Next Web

Google-backed Indian delivery startup Dunzo suffers data breach

Google-backed Indian hyperlocal delivery service Dunzo said it suffered a data breach that left customer data including email IDs and phone numbers exposed. Dunzo provides pick up and deliver services in over seven cities in India. Given the majority of India’s business relies on offline commerce, through Dunzo, you can ask a delivery person to visit a shop to purchase something and deliver it to you for nominal fees. The service also allows you to pick up a package from a friend’s place and drop it at your home. The company said that hackers gained unauthorized access to one of…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Google

How to turn off political ads on Facebook

Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff. It’s election year in the US, which means you’re probably going to see lots of political ads. While some social media platforms have banned them — such as Twitter — Facebook has yet to do so. But luckily, as of this June, it does offer an option to shut them off yourself. Facebook‘s history with political ads, and politics in general, is a complicated and unpleasant one. Suffice to say the platform’s infamous for hosting…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Facebook

Apple reportedly planning two MacBooks with ARM processors for 2020

Prolific Apple analyst Ming Chi Kuo is at it again with another prediction on Cupertino’s upcoming products. Specifically, Kuo believes Apple is planning to launch a 13.3-inch MacBook Pro and a new MacBook Air with the newfangled chips as early as this year, as well as 14 and 16-inch Pros next year. In a research note, Kuo says(via MacRumors): We predict that Apple will launch new MacBook models including the new 13.3-inch ?MacBook Pro? equipped with the ?Apple Silicon? in 4Q20, the new ?MacBook Air? equipped with the ?Apple Silicon? in 4Q20 or 1Q21, and new 14- and 16-inch ?MacBook…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Apple

Far Cry 6 details leak, and our fingers are crossed for a female protagonist

Ubisoft was apparently planning to reveal a new Far Cry game at its weekend E3 replacement event. Today, a leak gave away most of the major details about the game, including a look at the main villain. Ubisoft has also confirmed we’ll be seeing the game at the show. Anton would not be pleased. See you on Sunday at #UbiForward. pic.twitter.com/HieToJzDxp — Far Cry (@FarCrygame) July 10, 2020 We already suspected there was going to be a Far Cry game at this weekend’s event. Ubisoft allegedly has five games coming out this fiscal year — we could already account for Watch Dogs Legion, Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, Rainbow…

This story continues at The Next Web


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